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Curren$y – Weekend At Burnie’s | Album Review

June 24th, 2011 | by Henry Yanney



With the West Coast cornering the market for weed rap in the ’90s, a small handful of the Southern movement have taken the spirit of the previous drifters and revamped it for the new decade. Arguably the one artist who has proven to be the most successful with this blueprint is New Orleans’ Curren$y, whose previous releases have garnered a large following. Already providing one soundtrack to the summer with his Alchemist co-featured Covert Coups, Weekend at Burnies (a play on the classic ’80s slacker’ film Weekend At Bernie’s) hopes to maintain his grip on being the soundtrack to many drop top convertibles and slouched weekends during the sunny period.

Spitta’s laissez faire musings are as abundant as ever, slurring through verses but still containing some hitting lines and dope wordplay. The brilliant ‘#JetsGo’ rolls smoothly, opening the album with an ’80s-inspired production and Curren$y’s Jets repping, lavish lifestyle braggadocio working in sync with the dope score.

Ambient, smoky drones on ‘She Don’t Want A Man‘ are accompanied by Curren$y’s musings over an ambiguous partner. The sleepy, droopy ‘Televised’ provides lush dozing-off material reminiscent of productions from Zero 7, where both Spitta and International Jones emit ear appeasing verses to zone out to.

At times the laid back vibes are executed lazily to the point where the vibe is lost. ‘This Is The Life’’s smooth piano keys are marred by an overly simplistic chorus whilst ‘J.L.C’ trawls sleepily throughout the two minutes plus track. But returning to form on ‘On Gs’ and ‘Still’ results in the former Freshman channelling some classic chilled Southern anthems which really demonstrate the widened appeal of the Ski Beatz and Dame Dash affiliated rhymer.

Mark it as another successful outing for Curren$y. Whilst lyrically he may not have distinctively made the jump to the next level, his construction of songs still exerts a slickness and quality that some of the more accomplished rhymers are in need of. Productions on hand are sublime, metaphorically sending listeners on their own cloud far away – and when switching to the cruising vibes, equally compositions are as effective. Whilst the Pilot Talk series still triumphs over his later releases, Weekend At Burnies reassures Jets fans that the N.O free spirit is dopeness personified.

Curren$y – Weekend At Burnies
Released: June 28, 2011
Label: Warner Bros
Buy: iTunes US / Amazon US / Amazon UK

Comments

  1. […] y’s Weekend At Burnie’s is available to purchase on Warner Bros records now. Read our review here.[via Nah […]

  2. […] Weekend At Burnie’s is available to purchase on Warner Bros records now. Read our review here. [via Nah Right] // Tell A […]

  3. […] SOHH Score: 8.0 Mark it as another successful outing for Curren$y. Whilst lyrically he may not have distinctively made the jump to the next level, his construction of songs still exerts a slickness and quality that some of the more accomplished rhymers are in need of. Productions on hand are sublime, metaphorically sending listeners on their own cloud far away – and when switching to the cruising vibes, equally compositions are as effective. Whilst the Pilot Talk series still triumphs over his later releases, Weekend At Burnies reassures Jets fans that the N.O free spirit is dopeness personified.(Soul Culture) […]

  4. […] Critics agree that, while Weekend At Burnie’s may not be a masterpiece, Spitta cruises comfortably in his own lane, remaining true to his time-tested formula of style over substance. There’s not much Curren$y could have done better here. For longtime fans uncertain of Spitta flirting outside his circle, well, if the results of Covert Coup still didn’t change your mind, then here’s Weekend at Burnie’s. Most assume Curren$y releases so much material in a scattershot attempt at collecting buzz. Is he? Most rapper’s putting out as much material would have lost energy by now, or at the least compromised, but Spitta only seems all the more himself with each record. He’s been through the funnel, through the Young Money grater, and – thankfully – thought more of himself than the recent YM stars seem to. He’s said it himself; he’d rather stay in the underground. His reasoning isn’t too complicated: he wants to be able to make music he actually likes himself. Weekend at Burnie’s is perhaps the strongest evidence of this yet. (One Thirty BMP) Mark it as another successful outing for Curren$y. Whilst lyrically he may not have distinctively made the jump to the next level, his construction of songs still exerts a slickness and quality that some of the more accomplished rhymers are in need of. Productions on hand are sublime, metaphorically sending listeners on their own cloud far away – and when switching to the cruising vibes, equally compositions are as effective. Whilst the Pilot Talk series still triumphs over his later releases, Weekend At Burnies reassures Jets fans that the N.O free spirit is dopeness personified.(Soul Culture) […]

  5. […] and “She Don’t Want A Man” below, read SoulCulture’s review here and buy Weekend At Burnie’s […]